Category: Other Writing Events

Upcoming Fall Events

Hope everyone has had a productive and refreshing summer. We’re ready to get back to our full fall schedule at the Sudbury Writer’s Guild. 2017 marks our 25th year as group where local writers can get together to help each other further their writing goals.

At the end of last season we explored some new venues to host our ever expanding group and are happy to announce that College Boreal will be our new monthly meeting location. The classroom may change from time to time as availability changes, but for the fall season we will be meeting in Room M3340 on the 3rd floor.

We’ll be updating our ABOUT page shortly to include new directions.

Below are a number of local literary events/meetings including our own Guild Meeting happening over the next few months. Please come out and support local writers/voices. If you have information about other local events happening, please let us know. We’d be happy to share them here.

Tuesday September 26th – Sudbury Writers’ Guild Meeting

We will still be meeting the last Thursday of each month EXCEPT this September we will be meeting on TUESDAY  September 26th, 2017. The reason for the change is to accommodate members that want to attend Latitude 46’s Fall Book Launch on the 28th (More on this event in a moment).

Our first meeting of the fall is typically busy with members renewing memberships and planning of the upcoming season. We also excpect a lot of prospective members to come out to this event to find out what we’re all about. We’ll be in RM3340 on the 3rd Floor of the College. Doors open at 6pm and meeting is scheduled to start at 6:30 pm. We typically go to around 8:30 pm. Check out our Facebook group page if you want an event reminder or our Google Calendar on the right.

Thursday September 28th – Latitude 46 Fall Book Launch

Join Latitude 46 Publishing and authors Rod Carley, Suzanne Charron, Liisa Kovala, Roger Nash and Hap Wilson for the launch of their books. Featuring author readings and meet and greet social. Cash bar. Event begins at 7pm. Location – Verdicchio Ristorante – Natura Event Centre, 1351 Kelly Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario. Details here on Facebook –

Come out and Support local authors and our own Guild members, Liisa Kovala and Roger Nash.

Saturday October 21st – Kim Fahner – Book Launch – Some Other Sky

Sudbury’s Poet Laureate, Kim Fahner launches her latest collection of poetry “Some Other Sky”, published by Black Moss Press, on Saturday October 21st. Location is St. Andrew’s Place ( 111 Larch St, Sudbury) at 7pm. Books will be available for purchase $20.

November 2nd to 4th – Wordstock Sudbury Literary Festival

Sudbury’s Wordstock is back again for its 4th year with an amazing lineup of Canadian literary talent including – Merilyn Simmonds, Sean Michaels, Nathan Adler and Cherie Dimaline. More details will be announced in the coming weeks as the festival firms up its schedule. For now you can check out the Sudbury Star article here –  or visit the Wordstock Festival webpage here –

“Sometimes I Feel Like A Fox” wins Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award

Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox by Danielle Daniel

Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox by Danielle Daniel

Sudbury author and Writers’ Guild member Danielle Daniel has won the prestigious Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award tonight (Nov 17, 2016) for her book Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox, which was published by Groundwood Books in 2015. Danielle wrote and illustrated the book.

About the Book: In this introduction to the Anishinaabe tradition of totem animals, young children explain why they identify with different creatures such as a deer, beaver or moose. Delightful illustrations show the children wearing masks representing their chosen animal, while the few lines of text on each page work as a series of simple poems throughout the book. In a brief author’s note, Danielle Daniel explains the importance of totem animals in Anishinaabe culture and how they can also act as animal guides for young children seeking to understand themselves and others. (Groundwood Books)

Danielle was nominated for the award along with, In a Cloud of Dust – Written by Alma Fullerton and Illustrated by Brian Deines;  InvisiBill  – Written by Maureen Fergus and Illustrated by Dušan Petričić ; Sidewalk Flowers Storyline by JonArno Lawson and Illustrated by Sydney Smith and The Wolf-Birds Written and illustrated by Willow Dawson. The jury members were  Maria Martella, owner of Tinlids Inc., a wholesaler of children’s and teen books for schools and libraries; Janis Nostbakken, Children’s Media Specialist; Larry Swartz, Instructor, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and Brock University, and author of This Is a Great Book!

The prize was one of several handed out as part of the 2016 Canadian Children’s Book Centre Awards and was worth $20,000.

You can read more about the Canadian Children`s Book Centre Awards here –

Congrats to Danielle and the other winners tonight!

You can read more about the winners tonight here –

Danielle`s books is available locally as well as online through retailers such as Chapters Indigo and Amazon.

Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox at Chapters Indigo

Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox at

Playwrights’ Junction Workshop – APPLY NOW

Participants in 2013-14 Playwright's Junction include (back row, from left) Line Roberge, Caitlin Heppner, Matthew Heiti (co-ordinator), Andy Taylor and Jan Buley, (front row, from left) Jesse Brady, Jordano Bortolotto, Marie Woodrow and Anne Boulton.

Participants in 2013-14 Playwright’s Junction include (back row, from left) Line Roberge, Caitlin Heppner, Matthew Heiti (co-ordinator), Andy Taylor and Jan Buley, (front row, from left) Jesse Brady, Jordano Bortolotto, Marie Woodrow and Anne Boulton.

Last year I participated in the Playwrights’ Junction workshop offered by the Sudbury Theatre Centre and led by playwright-in-residence Matthew Heiti and it was one of the best learning of experiences of my writing career yet. They’re currently taking applications for the 4th season of the workshop (Deadline is September 15th) and I want to tell you why you should consider applying.

 “But I’m not a playwright and have no intention of writing for the stage.”

When I applied last year I had no illusion that I was a playwright, but I didn’t let that stop me. Writing for the stage is a unique experience, but there is a whole lot of overlap between writing prose for novels as there is in writing for theatre. I went in with an open mind. One of the things about being a “new” writer is that we are often trying to find our voice. Part of that journey can be experimenting in different genres and different mediums.

Here’s just a few of the things I appreciated about the workshop and that helped me grow as a writer.

  • DIALOGUE – In writing prose for novels, you can spend pages setting scenes, describing character’s motivations, moods and backstory. In theatre a lot of what gets conveyed to the audience is done through dialogue between characters (or in some cases monologues). The workshop definitely helped me see dialogue in an entirely new light.
  • MOTIVATION – If you’re like me it’s easier to say “I will get around to finishing that scene tomorrow, after I’ve binge watched this latest season on Netflix.” than it is to get motivated to spend time writing something that isn’t flowing. The writing assignments we had in the workshop helped motivate me into writing to a deadline. It was surprising how easy it was to get the muse to cooperate when there was a looming deadline to turn in an assignment.
  • FOCUS – Writing for the stage has unique constraints that might seem limiting by some, but can actually be freeing as it forces you to focus your writing. Your writing becomes sharper when you have to do more with less.
  • FEEDBACK – As scary as it sounds to some people, getting feedback on your work is an essential part to improving your craft. Having people critique your work in the workshop helped me to learn what was working and what wasn’t in my writing. Almost more important was what I learned by critiquing other people’s work. I could see my own strengths and weaknesses as a writer reflected back at me in their own work.
  • SHARING – Writing can be a very solitary and lonely experience. We often toil at our drafts for weeks, months, years on end before they see the light of day. The writing workshop allowed me share my work with my fellow playwrights and the instructor. As part of our “graduation” we had one of our pieces read aloud by professional actors in front of a live audience. Getting a laugh for a line you wrote can be just the carrot you need to keep writing.

I can’t say enough about Matthew Heiti as the instructor. Matthew is knowledgeable beyond his years when it comes to writing both prose and for the stage. He treated us fledgling playwrights as peers and gave us this once in a lifetime look behind the scenes of what goes into developing work for the stage.

I am forever grateful for the experience of being a part of the Playwright Junction and I hope you’ll take the opportunity to apply.

   Click Here For Playwright’s Junction Info – Sudbury Theatre Centre

I’ll be in the audience cheering you on if you do apply.




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